Favorite House Plants

I can’t say exactly when it happened, but I’ve become a plant hoarder.  Maybe because I’ve had increasing luck (or skill) keeping various species alive.  Perhaps because there are so many fun, beautiful, and different options out there.  Whatever the reason,  I’m certainly not sorry.  Plants add color and life-like nothing else can.  In honor of the impending spring, as well as my hoarding tendencies, I thought it’d be fun to round-up my favorite house plants.  Let’s start with the fern group, since that’s what I happen to have the most of.

By far the most fickle of my collection is the infamous Maidenhair Fern, an adiantum raddianum, to be exact.  I’m particularly proud to say I’ve kept this specific one alive for over two years.  My secret?  Don’t be afraid of over watering.  Ferns notoriously need more frequent watering, so I water this one a little every few days or so.  Giving it a mist at the same time never hurts.  This fella lives in our southern exposure living room where it gets plenty of bright, indirect light.

Coffee-Table-Finished-Top-Detail

Also in our living room is this ‘Kimberly Queen’ Australian Sword Fern.  Unlike the Maidenhair, it can tolerate a little more neglect, but I still water at the same time to save myself the hassle.

Australian-Sword-Fern-in-Living-Room

This Sprengeri Asparagus Fern has lived in our dining room for the past year, after picking it up from the outdoor annual section.  What started off as a small starter has begun to fill out and get those great droopy fronds.  I have a bar cart full of plants near our dining room door, so this one gets more light, some direct and it seems happy.

Asparagus-Fern-on-Plant-Stand

Bathrooms are a great place to keep ferns because of the higher humidity levels.  Luckily, our master bathroom has a south-facing window, letting in ample light for this guy.  Paired with the shower humidity, I water this one about once a week and it always looks fresh and healthy.

Fern-in-Master-Bathroom

Some ferns can handle slightly darker conditions, like this Kangaroo Paw.  The foliage on this is so beautiful and grows out fuzzy little ‘legs’.  As with the others, watering once or twice a week has kept this alive and thriving, with a ton of new growth.

Kangaroo-Paw-Fern-on-Coffee-Table

And the smallest in my grouping is this Selaginella Snow Top that I picked up around Christmas.  It loves water, especially in our low humidity home, so I keep it perched on the north facing kitchen window sill for easy watering every other day.

Selaginella-Snow-Top-Fern-on-Kitchen-Window-Sill

Other tips for keeping ferns alive:

  1.  Don’t remove the plant from the plastic store pots.  Instead, place inside a hole less planter.  If you’re an habitual plant killer caused by under watering, it’ll help show more exact watering needs.  Water, then check every day to see if there’s standing water left behind, and you can check the roots for dampness.  Try to keep track of the consumption and you’ll know how often to water.  If there’s standing water, it’s easy to dump out to prevent over watering.
  2. Keeping finicky plants near a water source makes it much harder to forget.
  3. Don’t place in direct sun.  Instead, choose a spot in the center of a bright room or closer to a window in a north facing space.

Okay, moving from the more difficult to the easy care plants, succulents and cacti.  Well draining soil is this categories BFF.  This long-haired Muppet is a Rhipsalis Baccifera.  It can tolerate low light, but prefers moderate light.  I happened upon this in the hanging plant section at Lowe’s, but prefer it in a taller footed planter.

Rhipsalis-Plant-in-Kitchen

In terms of texture, this Princess Pine succulent packs a punch.  Living in a smaller pot has forced it to branch out, spilling over the edges.

Princess-Pine-Succulent-on-Master-Window

The boys asked for a plant in their room, but it’s so easy to forget about it so I chose a super low maintenance Climbing Aloe.  The east window lets in plenty of light and the occasional watering is easy enough to handle.

Climbing-Aloe-Plant-in-Boys-Room

Sitting on the cart in the dining room, next to the asparagus fern is a Christmas Cactus.  It too is so easy to care for, just a watering per week and that’s all.

Christmas-Cactus-on-Plant-Stand

In my opinion, the easiest house plant of all is the Snake plant.  Luckily, they’re just as easy to find at home improvement stores.  Honestly, I think I water this one maybe every two weeks and let it soak up as much sun as possible next to our north facing door.  That’s it, nothing special.

Snake-Plant-in-Family-Room

As for larger growing plants, of course there’s the Fiddle Leaf Fig.  I found this one at Wal-Mart several weeks ago, but I’ve kept my other alive for nearly three years.  I can’t say I know all the tricks, but watering weekly and keeping in a bright room seem to help.

Fiddle-Leaf-Fig-in-Dining-Room

A Big Leaf Philodendron resides in a corner of our living room, near a window.  What started off as a smallish plant has become a crazy, splayed out creature of greatness.

Big-Leaf-Philodendron-Plant-in-Living-Room

Around the holidays, Norfolk Island Pines are abundant.  This one is small, but has doubled in size since I got it two years ago.  I water thoroughly once a week.

Norfolk-Pine-Tree-in-Living-Room

Now for the random group, starting with this Hoya I picked up on clearance because it was looking quite sad.  After bringing it home, I cut off all the dead, droopy leaves.  It’s perking up, but I’d love any tips on keeping it healthy and happy.

Hoya-Plant-in-Bathroom

For colorful foliage, a Croton can’t be beat.  Mine is on the small side, but has been a cinch to keep alive and growing.  New leaves sprout out the top and gradually change color with age.

Croton-on-Desk

I think the fastest growing plant in our home is this Peperomia.  When I bought it, it had three leaves on each stem.

Peperomia-Plant-in-Master-Bedroom

Pothos are another easy to find, easy to care for greenery.  I have three, two living in the brighter living room and entry and another on our mantle.  They’re not picky with lighting requirements, ranging from bright to low.

Pothos-in-Living-Room

Now that I’ve shared mine, care to share your favorite houseplants?  There are so many options, and I’ve realized I prefer greenery over flowers simply because I assume the plant is dying after the flowers fade away.

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5 thoughts on “Favorite House Plants

  1. I have a few similar to yours – a fern from my grandmother, a regular pothos and a marbled pothos, plus the snake plant, asparagus fern, and christmas cactus. Some of my other favorites include a rex begonia, because even when it isn’t blooming the foliage is gorgeous; a ponytail palm; crown of thorns (one with pink/red flowers and one with pale yellow flowers); and oxalis, of which I only have the green-leaved variety right now, but I also used to have a purple-leaved and the “iron cross” variety – they all look neat even when they’re not blooming. I have a couple types of jade, which are really easy to care for. Philodendrons are pretty easy too – they look similar to pothos, at least the ones I have do (I’ve never run across the likes of your big leaf philodendron – that thing is amazing!). I have a pretty tri-color dracaena too, and a couple different ivies. Basically…my whole house is plants. lol 🙂

  2. These are lovely! I really like the bright, petite leaves on the Maidenhair fern. So pretty! I can’t keep a plant alive to save my life, so opt for fresh flowers every week or so. I’ve picked up some faux plants to put around here and there that are thriving beautifully though! 🙂

    1. Hi Lori!

      Oooh, that’s a good question. My favorite place for white pots is Ikea. Target, TJ Maxx, Home Goods are all affordable options, especially in the spring and summer months. Thrift stores are great, but obviously hit or miss. For smaller plants like succulents, shallow bowls or candleholders are perfect. I have yet to find a good source for larger planters, but a 2.5 gallon bucket in a basket looks nice, too.

      Thanks!
      Amanda

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