A Glass Bathroom Door & Walnut Vanity

We started off our pool house remodel with a half bath between the house entrance and the bar space.  It had a narrow swinging door that forced snugging against the vanity just to close it.  The bathroom itself was dark, in part because of dark wood clad walls, but also from a lack of natural light.

New-House-Pool-to-House-April-13-2012

Our remodel plans included adding wider doors to the bathroom as well as the house.

Pool-House-April-Progress-Bathroom-Door

A six-foot wide sliding glass door now connects the house and this space.  When I proposed using the previous swinging glass door for the bathroom, Ben gave me a funny look.  I continued with my rationalization that I’d like a way to get natural light into the small space, and the glass door, with the addition of frosted film, was perfect.  This gave us a wider opening, and with a pocket door, a more user-friendly function.

Pool-House-Kitchen-Shelves-and-Pocket-Door

Adding a pocket door in a 2 by 6 framed wall is easier, and sturdier, than in a 2 by 4 wall.  Placing 2 by 4 boards flat on either side of the pocket area, with the track installed, makes a rigid wall.

Pool-House-April-Progress-Kitchen-and-Doors

Ben installed trim around the door frame to finish it off, with little brackets at the bottom to keep the door in line.

Pool-House-Bathroom-Pocket-Door-Base

I ordered a round locking pocket door handle to fill the hole from the previous knob.

Pool-House-Bathroom-Pocket-Door-Handle

Obviously, a clear glass door doesn’t give privacy for a bathroom.  We called a local glass company and asked for pricing on frosting a tempered glass door.  I don’t remember the price, but it was really reasonable.  However, they said there’s a 50/50 chance the process of frosting the tempered glass would shatter it.  We decided to play it safe and chose a frosted window film instead, applying it to the bathroom side of the door.

Pool-House-Bathroom-Pocket-Door-Frosting-Film

It obscures really well, unless someone is standing within inches from the door, but still lets light flood in.  With the door in place, we turned our attention to building the vanity.  My plan included a floating slatted shelf with a wooden band across the top.

Pool-House-Bathroom-Vanity

When building something, Ben always plans for MWS: most weight scenario.  To support the front of the shelf enough for a kid, or grown man, to stand on, Ben ran a steel pipe across the front of the shelf, drilling through the baseboard and wall for it to rest on the wood.  A cut piece of baseboard serves as a rest/support along the back.

Pool-House-Bath-Vanity-Bottom-Shelf-Spacing

Constructing the shelf was a pretty simple process.  A 2 1/2 inch thick face, a 1 inch wide strip (to cover the top of the pipe), 2 inch wide slats, and a 3/4 inch thick strips for the back.  We started at the center and used a 1 1/2 inch spacer to keep the width even.

Pool-House-Bath-Vanity-Building-Shelf

A dry fit run to make sure it fits before adding the final two strips along the sides.

Pool-House-Bath-Vanity-Bottom-Shelf-Set

Another cut piece of baseboard follows the top of the shelf, creating a nook for the shelf to rest in.  It also keeps the shelf removable for painting.  To support the vanity top, a wooden frame lines the walls, with a four-inch board along the front.

Pool-House-Bath-Vanity-Frames

With the walnut sanded, attached, and oiled, it’s a thing of beauty.

Pool-House-Bath-Vanity-Oiled

Keeping this space clear of unnecessary junk is important, and cabinets tend to become a catch-all for lotions and potions.  A single shelf allows room for a basket of toilet paper and a first aid bin.  Clearly, it didn’t take me long to test things out.

Pool-House-Bath-Vanity-Bottom-Shelf-With-Basket

Seeing the vanity peeking out has me excited to get the marble top in place and install the rest of the batten strips.

Pool-House-Bath-Vanity-Shelf-Installed

I’m still caulking away my spare time, but adding these finished elements is really making the end of this gigantic process seem within reach now.  There is light at the end of the tunnel.

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5 thoughts on “A Glass Bathroom Door & Walnut Vanity

  1. You and Ben have created “a spectacular abode” and your audience marvels at your vision, now almost complete! I’m sure the boys and their friends will enjoy this final project for many years to come!
    BRAVISSIMO!!!

  2. I love the finishes you’ve chosen for your house. Every time I see walnut, slate and marble together, it’s just so awesome. I LOVE that first aid tin. Can you share where you got it? I’ve been looking for a black and white one for our bathroom remodel. I’m thinking I might have to DIY something. Thanks!

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